The upsetting clip shows goslings (pictured) struggling to get out of the water at Liverpool docks which is choked with plastic bottles and other debris

Young family of geese try to make their way through plastic rubbish

Heartbreaking footage has emerged of a family of baby geese trying to make their way through a raft of plastic waste.

The upsetting clip shows goslings struggling to get out of the water at Liverpool docks which is choked with plastic bottles and other debris.

An adult Canada goose appears to be helping the gaggle of youngsters as they attempt to touch down on dry land.

The clip has been released amid news last month that the amount of plastic in the oceans is expected to triple in just ten years.

The distressing footage was taken on Waterloo Quay on Liverpool’s waterfront and is an indication of the extent of human waste in our waters.

The toll of plastic pollution in the sea could be 150 million tonnes by 2025 – treble the 50 million tonnes estimated in 2015.

The manager of the docks said despite the filth, the docks are cleaned on a regular basis, and were last cleaned just a few weeks ago.

‘We take our surroundings and the environment that our residents and tenants work and live in very seriously’, Liza Marco, an asset manager at Peel Land and Property Group Management Limited, which is responsible for space told Liverpool Echo.

The upsetting clip shows goslings (pictured) struggling to get out of the water at Liverpool docks which is choked with plastic bottles and other debris

The upsetting clip shows goslings (pictured) struggling to get out of the water at Liverpool docks which is choked with plastic bottles and other debris

The manager of the docks said despite the filth, the docks are cleaned on a regular basis, and were last cleaned just a few weeks ago

The manager of the docks said despite the filth, the docks are cleaned on a regular basis, and were last cleaned just a few weeks ago

On average the docks are cleaned three times a month, at a total cost of £35,000 ($47,000) last year, she revealed.

There are cleans scheduled for next week and the following week

‘Now that this video has been brought to our attention, an interim clean of the dock has been completed today’, she said.

On average the docks are cleaned three times a month, at a total cost of £35,000 ($47,000) last year, she revealed

On average the docks are cleaned three times a month, at a total cost of £35,000 ($47,000) last year, she revealed

The distressing footage was taken on Waterloo Quay on Liverpool's waterfront and is an indication of the extent of human waste in our waters

The distressing footage was taken on Waterloo Quay on Liverpool’s waterfront and is an indication of the extent of human waste in our waters

Earlier this week, the National Geographic announced it was launching a multi-year initiative aimed at reducing nine million tons of plastic waste.

It showcased heartbreaking images of the impact that single use plastic is having on the environment around the planet.

The striking images of marine animals that are entangled in, suffocated by, or have ingested plastic are just the smallest sampling of what National Geographic says are thousands to potentially millions of animals that have been devastatingly affected by the global plastic crisis.

Scientists estimate the growing plastic crisis could see the material remain in marine environments for at least 450 years, with the problem only getting worse, according to the organization’s release.

In the series of images released for National Geographic's Planet or Plastic campaign, ahead of its June issue, are several disturbing images from around the world. Here the photographer took it upon himself to free this stork from a plastic bag at a landfill in Spain

In the series of images released for National Geographic’s Planet or Plastic campaign, ahead of its June issue, are several disturbing images from around the world. Here the photographer took it upon himself to free this stork from a plastic bag at a landfill in Spain

Trapped in plastic: An old plastic fishing net snares a loggerhead turtle in the Mediterranean off Spain. The turtle could stretch its neck above water to breathe but would have died had the photographer not freed it

Trapped in plastic: An old plastic fishing net snares a loggerhead turtle in the Mediterranean off Spain. The turtle could stretch its neck above water to breathe but would have died had the photographer not freed it

To ride currents, seahorses clutch drifting seagrass or other natural debris. In the polluted waters off the Indonesian island of Sumbawa, this seahorse latched onto a plastic cotton swab, the photographer says he wishes this photo didn't exist

To ride currents, seahorses clutch drifting seagrass or other natural debris. In the polluted waters off the Indonesian island of Sumbawa, this seahorse latched onto a plastic cotton swab, the photographer says he wishes this photo didn’t exist

‘For 130 years, National Geographic has documented the stories of our planet, providing audiences around the world with a window into the earth’s breathtaking beauty as well as to the threats it faces,’ said Gary E. Knell, CEO of National Geographic Partners.

‘Each and every day, our explorers, researchers and photographers in the field witness firsthand the devastating impact of single-use plastic on our oceans, and the situation is becoming increasingly dire.’

‘Through the Planet or Plastic? initiative, we will share the stories of this growing crisis, work to address it through the latest science and research, and educate audiences around the world about how to eliminate single-use plastics and prevent them from making their way into our oceans,’ Mr Knell added.

Some animals now live in a world of plastics like these hyenas scavenging at a landfill in Harar, Ethiopia. They listen for garbage trucks and find much of their food in trash

Some animals now live in a world of plastics like these hyenas scavenging at a landfill in Harar, Ethiopia. They listen for garbage trucks and find much of their food in trash

Under a bridge on a branch of the Buriganga River in Bangladesh, a family removes labels from plastic bottles, sorting green from clear ones to sell to a scrap dealer- where waste pickers can earn around $100 (£74) a month

Under a bridge on a branch of the Buriganga River in Bangladesh, a family removes labels from plastic bottles, sorting green from clear ones to sell to a scrap dealer- where waste pickers can earn around $100 (£74) a month

Posted on; DailyMail>>

Check Also

The iOS version of the Gmail app now uses AI to figure out most important emails. There is also an option to turn off notifications for emails the technology deems unimportant

Never miss an important email again: Google is now using AI to alert you to ‘high priority’ messages

The iOS version of the Gmail app now uses AI to figure out most important emails. There is also an option to turn off notifications for emails the technology deems unimportant.