Saltstraumen in northern Norway is home to the biggest whirlpools in the world

World of Tides: Incredible facts about earth’s waterways

Water covers almost three-quarters of the earth’s surface and there’s still lots to discover about the deep blue.

But in a bid to shed some light on how our mysterious seas, rivers and lakes work, a new book titled The World of Tides reveals a fascinating raft of facts.

From the world’s biggest whirlpool to the tallest tsunami and the highest tide, MailOnline Travel has fished out a selection of highlights for you to have a quick swim through and added a few more insights from elsewhere…

Saltstraumen in northern Norway is home to the biggest whirlpools in the world

Saltstraumen in northern Norway is home to the biggest whirlpools in the world

Over 20 per cent of the population in the Netherlands lives below sea level. Pictured is the capital, Amsterdam

Over 20 per cent of the population in the Netherlands lives below sea level. Pictured is the capital, Amsterdam

Pitt Lake, an hour's drive inland from Vancouver, is the second largest tidal lake in the world. It is around 15 miles long, 2.4 miles at its widest and up to 492 feet deep

Pitt Lake, an hour’s drive inland from Vancouver, is the second largest tidal lake in the world. It is around 15 miles long, 2.4 miles at its widest and up to 492 feet deep

The Bay of Fundy is home to the highest tides in the world
This landscape on the east coast of Canada can experience an extreme 53.4 foot vertical range from high to low

The Bay of Fundy is home to the highest tides in the world. According to the Guinness Book of Records, this landscape on the east coast of Canada can experience an extreme 53.4 foot vertical range from high to low

Every year nearly one metre of water is evaporated from the surface of the Mediterranean Sea - but it gets replenished by water from the Atlantic

Every year nearly one metre of water is evaporated from the surface of the Mediterranean Sea – but it gets replenished by water from the Atlantic

The tallest tsunami recorded hit on July 9th 1958 in Alaska's Lituya Bay, pictured, and grew to a staggering 1,719 feet - taller than the Empire State building

The tallest tsunami recorded hit on July 9th 1958 in Alaska’s Lituya Bay, pictured, and grew to a staggering 1,719 feet – taller than the Empire State building

Mont Saint-Michel, a tidal island off the French coast, experiences the highest tides in Europe at 45.9 feet
The rising water at the landmark is part of the appeal for tourists

Mont Saint-Michel, a tidal island off the French coast, experiences the highest tides in Europe at 45.9 feet

The largest tidal bore (a wave flowing up a river) in the world is the Silver Dragon, pictured, in China's Qiantang River. The sight of the bore charging up the river from Hangzhou Bay has been likened to 10,000 horses galloping across an open plain, and every year tens of thousands of people flock to the river to watch

The largest tidal bore (a wave flowing up a river) in the world is the Silver Dragon, pictured, in China’s Qiantang River. The sight of the bore charging up the river from Hangzhou Bay has been likened to 10,000 horses galloping across an open plain, and every year tens of thousands of people flock to the river to watch

The sea is home to the world's largest living structure ¿ the Great Barrier Reef. Measuring around 1,615 miles-long, the ecosystem off the coast of Queensland in northeastern Australia can even be seen from space

The sea is home to the world’s largest living structure – the Great Barrier Reef. Measuring around 1,615 miles-long, the ecosystem off the coast of Queensland in northeastern Australia can even be seen from space

The World of Tides takes the reader around the world's most extraordinary coasts and seas

The World of Tides takes the reader around the world’s most extraordinary coasts and seas

The world's deepest blue hole - a cave or shaft just below sea level - can be found on the Atlantic edge of the Bahamas at Turtle Cove. Called Dean's Blue Hole (pictured), it measures 663ft in depth and 250ft wide

The world’s deepest blue hole – a cave or shaft just below sea level – can be found on the Atlantic edge of the Bahamas at Turtle Cove. Called Dean’s Blue Hole (pictured), it measures 663ft in depth and 250ft wide

Sources: The World of Tides by William Thomson published by Quercus, www.sciencekids.co.nz, www.natgeokids.com, www2.padi.com, Guinness Book of Records

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