Toyota's AI-enabled Concept-i prototype, which was unveiled at the 2017 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas

Toyota joins Intel to create self-driving car ‘ecosystem’

Industry leaders in the self-driving car race have teamed up to create an ‘ecosystem’ to push the technology further.

Intel and Toyota, among others, announced today they have joined forces to create the Automotive Edge Computing Consortium.

The companies plan to share data to boost the creation of maps and improved driver assistance technology.

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Toyota's AI-enabled Concept-i prototype, which was unveiled at the 2017 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas

Toyota’s AI-enabled Concept-i prototype, which was unveiled at the 2017 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas

THE CONSORTIUM

Several firms just joined forces to create the Automotive Edge Computing Consortium.

This includes Intel, DENSO, Ericsson, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT), NTT DOCOMO and both the Toyota InfoTechnology Center Co. and Toyota Motor Corp.

They plan to share data to create a self-driving car ‘ecosystem’ and push technology in the space, including maps and intelligent driving.

They will also focus on increasing network capacity to accommodate automotive big data between vehicles and the cloud.

It’s estimated that the data volume between vehicles and the cloud will reach 10 exabytes per month around 2025, which is approximately 10,000 times larger than the present volume.

The collaboration of global companies will ensure the new architectures created to handle the expected data increase will meet applicable standards.

‘The objective of the consortium is to develop an ecosystem for connected cars to support emerging services such as intelligent driving, the creation of maps with real-time data and driving assistance based on cloud computing,’ the announcement reads.

Also joining the consortium are DENSO, Ericsson, Intel, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT), and NTT DOCOMO.

Both Toyota InfoTechnology Center Co. and Toyota Motor Corp. are part of the group as well, and the group is looking to expand to include other firms as time goes on.

‘In the coming months, the aforementioned companies will initiate activities to invite relevant global technology leaders and expand the consortium,’ Toyota says.

Overall, the consortium will focus on increasing network capacity to accommodate automotive big data between vehicles and the cloud.

It’s estimated that the data volume between vehicles and the cloud will reach 10 exabytes per month around 2025, which is approximately 10,000 times larger than the present volume.

New architectures of network and computing structure will be necessary to handle the expected increase, and gathering several global companies to collaborate will be the best way to make sure the new architectures meet applicable standards.

The consortium will define requirements and develop use cases for emerging mobile devices with a particular focus on the automotive industry, bringing them to standards bodies, industry consortiums and solution providers.

The Concept-i's AI will use biometric sensors to detect and analyze how your feeling, then kicking automated driving features into gear accordingly. 'Let's say, for example, that you're feeling sad; the AI will analyze your emotion, make a recommendation and if necessary, take over and drive you safely to your destination,' Toyota says

The Concept-i’s AI will use biometric sensors to detect and analyze how your feeling, then kicking automated driving features into gear accordingly. ‘Let’s say, for example, that you’re feeling sad; the AI will analyze your emotion, make a recommendation and if necessary, take over and drive you safely to your destination,’ Toyota says

It will also encourage the development of best practices for the distributed and layered computing approach recommended by the members.

Earlier this week, Intel announced plans for a fleet of self-driving cars following its completion of the purchase of Israeli autonomous technology firm Mobileye.

A day after closing the $15 billion deal to buy Mobileye, which specializes in driver-assistance systems, Intel said it will begin rolling out fully autonomous vehicles later this year for testing in Europe, Israel, and the US.

The fleet will eventually have more than 100 vehicles, according to Intel.

Silicon Valley giant Intel on Wednesday announced plans for a fleet of self-driving cars following its completion of the purchase of Israeli autonomous technology firm Mobileye. A Mobileye camera system that can be installed in your car is pictured

Silicon Valley giant Intel on Wednesday announced plans for a fleet of self-driving cars following its completion of the purchase of Israeli autonomous technology firm Mobileye. A Mobileye camera system that can be installed in your car is pictured

WHAT IS MOBILEYE?

Mobileye’s software, which reads inputs from cameras, radar, and laser sensors and makes decisions on what an autonomous car should do.

Jerusalem-based Mobileye says it has contracts with 27 different automakers.

It also makes software that runs automatic emergency braking and semi-autonomous cruise control systems that are in cars and trucks on the road today.

The testing in real-world conditions ‘provides immediate feedback and will accelerate delivery of technologies and solutions for highly and fully autonomous vehicles,’ said Mobileye co-founder Amnon Shashua, who is to run the unit for Intel.

‘Our goal is to develop autonomous vehicle technology that can be deployed anywhere.’

The Intel test fleet with include various types and makes of vehicles, and capitalize on Mobileye’s expertise in computer vision, mapping and sensing.

Intel, which has been expanding beyond its core of computer chipmaking, is keen for its technology to be an engine powering self-driving systems across the spectrum of vehicle makers.

‘We want to enable automakers to deliver driverless cars faster while reducing costs,’ Shashua said.

Intel said the vehicles would offer ‘level 4’ autonomy, which under industry standards represents a ‘high’ level of autonomy just below the fully automated level 5.

US tech giant Intel, which has completed its acquisition of Israel's Mobileye, is rolling out a fleet of self-driving vehicles for testing in the United States, Europe and Israel

US tech giant Intel, which has completed its acquisition of Israel’s Mobileye, is rolling out a fleet of self-driving vehicles for testing in the United States, Europe and Israel

INTEL’S TAKE ON SELF-DRIVING CARS

Self-driving cars are predicted to reduce motor accidents by 90 percent, but Intel’s CEO believes the technology has more to offer than just decreasing collision rates.

Brian Krzanich recently said in an interview that he foresees autonomous vehicles doubling as security cameras.

Although many are concerned about privacy issues, the ability to have ‘eyes’ on the road could be beneficial during Amber alerts, as these cars will have the power to spot a specific license plat ‘quite rapidly’.

Intel also sponsored a study this month that discussed how passengers of autonomous vehicles will spend their time when they no longer have to keep their eyes on the road.

This means riders will be able to stream movies during their travels and surf the web – providing advertisers with new outlets for targeting ads.

This will create a ‘personal economy’ sector that is said to be a $7 trillion business by 2050.

Most major automakers and several other technology firms have been stepping up efforts on autonomous driving in recent years, contending these systems will eliminate the vast majority of road accidents.

Apple has a testing permit in California.

German luxury carmaker Daimler and auto parts supplier Bosch have announced plans to work together to create completely driverless cars in the next few years.

US-based Tesla boasts that all its models are built with the hardware for self-driving in event regulators five the technology a green light.

US car rental giant Avis Budget earlier this year announced it will team up with Waymo on the self-driving cars being tested on Arizona roads.

Posted on; DailyMail>>

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