The map (pictured) was created by Seattle-based programmer Andrei Kashcha, using data provided by the US National Weather Service.

Mesmerising wind map of the world shows real time gusts

A mesmerising map that shows up-to-date air currents across the world in breathtaking beauty has been created by a computer programmer.

The animated graphic shows worldwide weather conditions, with powerful gusts snaking their way around our planet in real-time.

Each time the visualisation restarts, it shows individual wind currents in a different area of the globe which then spread out to cover the surface of the Earth.

Each line on the map represents a wind current while colours indicate windspeed – the darker the colour, the faster the breeze.

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A mesmerising map that shows up-to-date air currents across the world in breathtaking beauty has been created by a computer programmer. Each time the visualisation restarts, it shows individual wind currents in a different area of the globe which then spread out to cover the surface of the Earth

The map was created by Seattle-based programmer Andrei Kashcha, using data provided by the US National Weather Service.

Every six hours, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) operational model archive and distribution system publishes weather data for the whole globe.

Among these services is the Global Forecast System (GFS), which comes in the form of a latitude/longitude grid with a number of associated values, including wind speed.

It’s encoded in a special type of binary called GRIB, a data format commonly used in meteorology to store historical and forecast weather data to be read by computers.

This can be transformed into information that people can work with using a version of the programming language JavaScript, commonly used in websites.

The animated graphic shows worldwide Andrei Kashchaweather conditions, with powerful gusts snaking their way around our planet in real-time. Each line on the map represents a wind current while colours indicate windspeed - the darker the colour, the faster the breeze

The animated graphic shows worldwide Andrei Kashchaweather conditions, with powerful gusts snaking their way around our planet in real-time. Each line on the map represents a wind current while colours indicate windspeed – the darker the colour, the faster the breeze

Mr Kascha posted the code he used to create the visualisation on open-source web hosting service Github.

Speaking about his masterpiece on Reddit, he said: ‘My work is specifically focused on building static visualizations of a vector field with streamlines.

‘What does this mean? A vector field is just a fancy way of saying that each point on a map has some sort of a vector associated with it.

‘To visualize a vector field, one can drop thousands of particles and let them flow throw the field, treating each vector as a velocity.

The map was created by programmer Andrei Kashcha, using data provided by the US National Weather Service. Every six hours, it publishes weather data for the whole globe. This image shows westerly winds in the southern hemisphere mixing with southeasterly trade winds to the north, which may contribute to the Indian Ocean Gyre

The map was created by programmer Andrei Kashcha, using data provided by the US National Weather Service. Every six hours, it publishes weather data for the whole globe. This image shows westerly winds in the southern hemisphere mixing with southeasterly trade winds to the north, which may contribute to the Indian Ocean Gyre

Each line on the map represents a wind current. This image shows winds involved the Gulf Stream, which makes northwest Europe milder than other regions at the same latitude, over the Atlantic between North America and Europe

Each line on the map represents a wind current. This image shows winds involved the Gulf Stream, which makes northwest Europe milder than other regions at the same latitude, over the Atlantic between North America and Europe

‘”Streamlines” is a different way to visualize a field. Instead of randomly changing particle’s position, we preserve a path of a single particle as long as it “lives” inside the bounding box.

‘We could randomly sample particles on the map, and trace their lines, but that would result in uneven distribution of the lines.

‘This visualization tries to keep wind lines evenly distributed from each other. For this I render every new line at given distance from a “seed” line, making sure it never comes closer than allowed.’

A number of users of the social media site were impressed by Mr Kashcha’s handiwork.

Nthiteration said: ‘This is really amazing. Thank you for posting it. This would make a beautiful wall art.

Colours represent windspeed, the darker the colour, the faster the breeze. This image shows the complex web of wind currents which whip across the Earth's surface. Winds and currents in the Pacific on the left flow predominantly from East to West. Above the equator Pacific Ocean trade winds blow from the northeast. Below the equator they blow from the southeast

Colours represent windspeed, the darker the colour, the faster the breeze. This image shows the complex web of wind currents which whip across the Earth’s surface. Winds and currents in the Pacific on the left flow predominantly from East to West. Above the equator Pacific Ocean trade winds blow from the northeast. Below the equator they blow from the southeast

Here, wind currents cover almost the entire surface of the planet. To the top left of this image a gap in the Pacific winds shows the approximate location of the North Pacific Gyre, home to the Great Pacific garbage patch

Here, wind currents cover almost the entire surface of the planet. To the top left of this image a gap in the Pacific winds shows the approximate location of the North Pacific Gyre, home to the Great Pacific garbage patch

‘I’m seriously considering having it printed on canvas and hung on my wall.’

Fascinatingly, the map gives viewers an insight into the five major ocean gyres, the large systems of rotating ocean currents, particularly those involved with large wind movements.

The five – located in the Indian Ocean and in the north and south of the Pacific and the Atlantic – are clearly visible and their affects can be traced throughout the world.

Perhaps the most striking example is the Gulf Stream, which makes northwest Europe milder than other regions at the same latitude.

These ocean currents are generated from the forces acting upon the water like the Earth’s rotation, the wind, the temperature and salinity differences and the gravitation of the moon.

Also visible is a gap in the Pacific winds, which shows the approximate location of the North Pacific Gyre, home to the Great Pacific garbage patch.

Posted on; DailyMail>>

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