Users met with a message from Twitter today pushing them to share data with advertisers can select 'review settings' to review a list of things Twitter already knows (pictured)

How to turn off Twitter’s invasive new feature

Twitter users logging in today have been met with a message from the company pushing them to share their personal data with advertisers.

The company claims that sharing the data will lead to a more ‘personalised’ experience.

By selecting the ‘sounds good’ option, users agree to Twitter tracking some of the websites they visit.

But users can select ‘review settings’ to switch the creepy new feature off for good, as well as to review a list of things Twitter already knows.

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Users met with a message from Twitter today pushing them to share data with advertisers can select 'review settings' to review a list of things Twitter already knows (pictured)

Users met with a message from Twitter today pushing them to share data with advertisers can select 'review settings' to review a list of things Twitter already knows (pictured)

Users met with a message from Twitter today pushing them to share data with advertisers can select ‘review settings’ to review a list of things Twitter already knows (pictured)

HOW TO SEE WHAT TWITTER KNOWS ABOUT YOU

The social media giant is surprisingly transparent about the private data they store, all of which can be found in ‘Your Twitter data’ in the app’s left hand menu.

This will show you all of the information about you that Twitter has calculated based on your profile and activity.

This includes gender and age, devices and browsers you have logged in from, the places you have logged in from, and apps Twitter has ‘collected’ from your devices.

The message said that Twitter is ‘working with ad partners in new ways to improve the tailored ads you already see’.

In a blog post explaining the changes, Twitter said that it selects adverts to show on a user’s timeline based on a number of factors.

‘If you have the “Track where you see Twitter content across the web” setting enabled in your “Personalisation and data” settings, we may consider your visits to other websites that integrate Twitter content (such as embedded timelines),’ it said.

‘For example, if you regularly visit birdwatching websites, we might suggest accounts that frequently Tweet about that topic, or show you ads for binoculars or birdfeeders.’

For those who don’t want Twitter snooping on the websites they visit, there is a way to switch off the tracking.

When the new message pops up, rather than clicking the ‘sounds good’ button, select the ‘review settings’ button instead.

This will take you through to your ‘Personalisation and data’ settings, allowing you to control how Twitter collects and uses your information.

You can choose whether Twitter reads your interests, the apps on your phone, the devices you use, or the places you’ve been to tailor the adverts on your timeline.

You can also select whether or not you want the company to track where you see Twitter content across the web, or share your private data with its partners.

For those who wish to remove all personalised advertising from their Twitter experience, select the ‘Disable all’ button on the ‘Personalisation and data’ page.

Twitter users logging in today have been met with a message from the company pushing them to share their personal data with advertisers. The company claims that sharing the data will lead to a more 'personalised' experience

Twitter users logging in today have been met with a message from the company pushing them to share their personal data with advertisers. The company claims that sharing the data will lead to a more 'personalised' experience

Twitter users logging in today have been met with a message from the company pushing them to share their personal data with advertisers. The company claims that sharing the data will lead to a more ‘personalised’ experience

The social media giant is surprisingly transparent about the private data they store, all of which can be found in ‘Your Twitter data’ in the app’s left hand menu.

This will show you all of the information about you that Twitter has calculated based on your profile and activity.

This includes gender and age, devices and browsers you have logged in from, the places you have logged in from, and apps Twitter has ‘collected’ from your devices.

By selecting the 'sounds good' option, users agree to Twitter tracking some of the websites they visit. But users can select 'review settings' to reach the screen pictured here, in which they can change what they share with the company

By selecting the 'sounds good' option, users agree to Twitter tracking some of the websites they visit. But users can select 'review settings' to reach the screen pictured here, in which they can change what they share with the company

By selecting the ‘sounds good’ option, users agree to Twitter tracking some of the websites they visit. But users can select ‘review settings’ to reach the screen pictured here, in which they can change what they share with the company

The company claims that it never links users’ web history with details that can identify them, such as their name, email address, phone number or Twitter handle.

It also deletes, obfuscates, or aggregates the data after no longer than 30 days.

‘We are committed to offering you meaningful privacy choices,’ the company said.

‘If you don’t want personalisation (including ads) based on your visits to third-party websites that integrate Twitter content, there are several ways to turn off this feature.’

The message said that Twitter is 'working with ad partners in new ways to improve the tailored ads you already see'

The message said that Twitter is 'working with ad partners in new ways to improve the tailored ads you already see'

The message said that Twitter is ‘working with ad partners in new ways to improve the tailored ads you already see’

Posted on; DailyMail>>

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