Gay people don’t get top leadership positions at work

Gay men face discrimination from top jobs in the workplace because of their more feminine sounding voices, a study has found.

The same is true of lesbian women whose voices tend to be huskier, the research showed.

In an experiment, heterosexual people listening to the voices of gay people also felt that they should be paid less than ‘heterosexual sounding’ people.

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Gay men face discrimination from top jobs in the workplace because of their more feminine sounding voices, a study has found. The same is true of lesbian women whose voices tend to be huskier, the research showed (stock image)

Gay men face discrimination from top jobs in the workplace because of their more feminine sounding voices, a study has found. The same is true of lesbian women whose voices tend to be huskier, the research showed (stock image)

VOICE-BASED DISCRIMINATION

In a further study, participants were asked to listen to two voices and predict what their interests are.

Those with homosexual voices were considered to be less interested in ‘typically masculine’ activities such as football.

They were considered more interested in ‘typically feminine’ activities such as dance.

The researchers, who carried out their study in Italy, also found that when asked which of the speakers they would like to be acquainted with socially, male participants were more likely to avoid the ‘gay-sounding’ speakers.

Lead author Dr Fabio Fasoli said : ‘What is most concerning about this study is the subconscious behaviour intention of participants, where heterosexual male participants avoided choosing a gay male as an acquaintance.’

Researchers at the University of Surrey played recordings of gay and heterosexual speakers to 40 heterosexual men, and showed the listeners a picture of the speaker.

The participants were not informed of the sexual orientation of the person they were listening to.

They were then asked to form impressions about the applicants as to their suitability for a fictional job of chief executive officer, and the monthly salary they should be awarded.

Participants who correctly identified the speaker as gay or lesbian were viewed as inadequate for the leadership role, the researchers said.

Among the male candidates, voice was the key factor that led to discrimination.

Having a ‘heterosexual’ or ‘straight’ sounding voice, rather than a ‘gay- sounding voice’ led the listeners to think the candidate was more suitable for the job and also deserved a higher salary.

For lesbian candidates, listeners considered that they ‘lacked femininity’ and they received lower evaluations than their non-gay counterparts.

The voices were taken from a database compiled by another researcher, Simone Sulpizio.

The researchers, writing in the journal Archives of Sexual Behaviour, used the two voices categorised as sounding ‘most gay’ and ‘most heterosexual’ in previous studies.

Dr Fabio Fasoli, lead researcher, said: ‘These results demonstrate that the mere sound of a voice is sufficient to trigger stereotyping, denying gay- and lesbian-sounding speakers the qualities that are considered typical of their gender.

Researchers at the University of Surrey played recordings of gay and heterosexual speakers to 40 heterosexual men, and showed the listeners a picture of the speaker. Heterosexual people felt that gay people should be paid less than ‘heterosexual sounding’ people (stock image)

Researchers at the University of Surrey played recordings of gay and heterosexual speakers to 40 heterosexual men, and showed the listeners a picture of the speaker. Heterosexual people felt that gay people should be paid less than ‘heterosexual sounding’ people (stock image)

‘It is revealing, that despite all the work to lessen discrimination against the LGBT community, people subconsciously typecast an individual before getting to know them. This study highlights that it can be a real problem in the workplace and for people’s career prospects.

In a further study, participants were asked to listen to two voices and predict what their interests are.

Those with homosexual voices were considered to be less interested in ‘typically masculine’ activities such as football, and more interested in ‘typically feminine’ activities such as dance.

The researchers, who carried out their study in Italy, also found that when asked which of the speakers they would like to be acquainted with socially, male participants were more likely to avoid the ‘gay-sounding’ speakers.

Dr Fasoli said: ‘What is most concerning about this study is the subconscious behaviour intention of participants, where heterosexual male participants avoided choosing a gay male as an acquaintance.

‘This study demonstrates that unacceptable levels of discrimination, be they subconscious or conscious, still exists in our society, and we need to do more to tackle the discrimination faced by the LGBT community.’

Posted on; DailyMail>>

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