Jennifer Jones, 40, underwent a lung transplant at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, in October after cystic fibrosis had reduced her lung function to 10 percent. Her fiancé captured the moment she took her first breath on camera

Cystic fibrosis sufferer’s first breath with new lungs

Growing up, she always thought she just suffered from bad asthma.

At the age of 29, Jennifer Jones was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis, a genetic disorder with a life expectancy rate of 37 that is normally identified in infancy.

In October, the now 40-year-old at the underwent a lung transplant at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, the disease had reduced her lung function to 10 percent.

Her fiancé Robert Ronnenberg, 38, recorded the breathtaking moment of her trying out the new lungs after the surgery.

Jennifer Jones, 40, underwent a lung transplant at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, in October after cystic fibrosis had reduced her lung function to 10 percent. Her fiancé captured the moment she took her first breath on camera

Jennifer Jones, 40, underwent a lung transplant at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, in October after cystic fibrosis had reduced her lung function to 10 percent. Her fiancé captured the moment she took her first breath on camera

Now that Jennifer has a new set of lungs, she and fiancé Robert Ronnenberg, 38, are planning to get married

Now that Jennifer has a new set of lungs, she and fiancé Robert Ronnenberg, 38, are planning to get married

As a child, Jennifer was tested for cystic fibrosis (CF), a progressive disorder that leads to the buildup of mucus of the lungs that blocks the airways over time.

The results came back negative.

‘Throughout her life she struggled with breathing and had an incredibly frequent cough, which was explained as asthma or allergies and treated as such,’ Robert said.

What is cystic fibrosis

Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disease that causes persistent infections in the lungs and limits one’s ability to breathe over time.

A defective gene causes a thick, sticky buildup of mucus in the lungs, clogging airways and trapping bacteria that leads to infections, lung damage and eventual respiratory failure.

Mucus buildup also occurs in the pancreas, preventing the release of digestive enzymes that allow the body to break down food and absorb vital nutrients.

CF is typically diagnosed in infancy and has a life expectancy rate of 37 years old.

There are approximately 30,000 cases of CF in the US, with roughly 1,000 new cases diagnosed each year.

In 2007 Jennifer’s second child, Wes, was tested for multiple forms of diseases and doctors found he was a carrier of CF.

While explaining her son’s results, the genetic counselor noticed Jennifer’s frequent small coughs and offered to test her again.

Just before Jennifer’s 30th birthday she was finally diagnosed with the disease that is usually diagnosed before a person reaches the age of two.

The second test revealed that she had about 65 percent of her lung function.

In the years following her diagnosis Jennifer took daily medicines, had breathing treatments and routine stays in the hospital once or twice a year to try to maintain her health as long as possible, but it was slowly declining.

Her condition took a dramatic turn late in October of 2016 and she was put on oxygen full time.

In June 2017 she was added to the lung donor list and by October she was hospitalized and told she would likely be there until a new set of lungs became available.

On the morning of October 18th, breathing tests indicated that she had just over 10 percent of her lung function left.

‘It just so happens that it was the afternoon of that same day she received the call we’ve been waiting for: there were lungs for her,’ Robert said.

After the surgery, Robert began filming the removal of Jennifer’s breathing tube.

In the video she looks apprehensive as the doctor starts to undo the tape holding the tube.

Then he pulls the tube out of her mouth and a look of shock washes over Jennifer’s face as she inhales.

‘I felt like I was flying. I thought I was just up there and couldn’t take a deep enough breath and it was incredible,’ Jennifer told ABC6.

As the doctor begins removing the breathing tube, Jennifer looks apprehensive
After he pulls the it out of her mouth and she takes her first breath shock washes over her face

As the doctor begins removing the breathing tube, Jennifer looks apprehensive, but after he pulls the it out of her mouth and she takes her first breath shock washes over her face

Four months post-transplant, Jennifer is ‘doing amazing’, according to Robert.

‘She can hold conversations without stopping to catch her breath, she can wash her face in the shower without being afraid of the water because she can’t hold her breath,’ Robert said.

She’s looking forward to a foot race with 11-year-old Wes at their home in Byron, Minnesota, something she’s never been able to do before. She also has a daughter, Abby.

The couple decided to share Jennifer’s story to encourage people to become organ donors.

Four months post-transplant, the mother-of-two is 'doing amazing' according to fiancé Robert

Four months post-transplant, the mother-of-two is ‘doing amazing’ according to fiancé Robert

Posted on; DailyMail>>

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