More than 50 bones were discovered by tourists at the Cave of Francis (pictured) - also known as 'Massacre Cave' - on the Scottish island of Eigg last year

Bones in ‘Massacre Cave’ belong to a teenager

Archaeologists believe bones found in a Scottish cave are those of a teenage victim of a 16th century feud in which hundreds of members of a clan were wiped out.

More than 50 bones were discovered by tourists at the Cave of Francis – also known as ‘Massacre Cave’ – on the Scottish island of Eigg last year.

Around 400 members of the MacDonald clan were believed to have been murdered in the cave around the year 1577.

More than 50 bones were discovered by tourists at the Cave of Francis (pictured) - also known as 'Massacre Cave' - on the Scottish island of Eigg last year

More than 50 bones were discovered by tourists at the Cave of Francis (pictured) – also known as ‘Massacre Cave’ – on the Scottish island of Eigg last year

According to tradition, the victims had been hiding there for three days when they were discovered by raiders from the rival MacLeod clan of Skye.

The MacLeods then piled thatch and roof timbers at the entrance before setting it alight, causing the occupants to suffocate.

Using carbon testing, archaeologists at Historic Environment Scotland were able to date the remains to between 1430 and 1620, The Scotsman reported.

Scientists have now confirmed that the bones – which were all from the same skeleton – are those of a teenager no older than 16. However they were unable to determine their sex or stature.

Around 400 members of the MacDonald clan were believed to have been murdered in the cave (pictured) around the year 1577

Around 400 members of the MacDonald clan were believed to have been murdered in the cave (pictured) around the year 1577

The feud between the two clans is thought to have wiped out almost the entire population of the island, where around 100 people are thought to be living today

The feud between the two clans is thought to have wiped out almost the entire population of the island, where around 100 people are thought to be living today

Archaeologists at Bradford University now hope to find out more about the diet and lifestyle of occupants of the island at the time of the massacre before the bones are returned.

‘When post-excavation analysis has been completed we will discuss what happens next with the community of Eigg,’ Kirsty Owen, senior archaeology manager at Historic Environment Scotland, told the paper.

‘The decision will be made jointly with them.’

The massacre is believed to have been act of revenge by the MacLeod clan after a group of them were cast adrift by islanders for harassing local women.

Furious, a group of MacLeods landed on Eigg. But they were spotted by islanders, who fled to the Cave of Francis, a decision which proved to be their downfall.

The feud between the two clans is thought to have wiped out almost the entire population of the island, where around 100 people are thought to be living today.

Archaeologists at Bradford University now hope to find out more about the diet and lifestyle of occupants of the island at the time of the massacre before the bones are returned

Archaeologists at Bradford University now hope to find out more about the diet and lifestyle of occupants of the island at the time of the massacre before the bones are returned

Posted on; DailyMail>>

Check Also

It¿s a common assumption that the furry fandom is dominated by themes of interspecies sex. In fact, roughly 35 percent of the public believes sex is a furry¿s ¿top priority,¿ according to new research ¿ but, furries themselves largely disagree. Stock image

Only 4% of furries say their ‘fandom’ is about sex

In the new study, titled Pleasures of the Fur , researchers examined data from The Furry Survey to find out more about the community – and the misconceptions around it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *