The African group of ambassadors to the United Nations has issued an extraordinary statement condemning the 'outrageous, racist and xenophobic remarks' by President Donald Trump and demanding a retraction and apology

African ambassadors to UN blast Trump remark as ‘racist’

The African group of ambassadors to the United Nations has issued an extraordinary statement condemning the ‘outrageous, racist and xenophobic remarks’ by President Donald Trump and demanding a retraction and apology.

Former US ambassador to the UN Samantha Power has shared the statement on Twitter, saying: ‘Whoa. I’ve never seen a statement like this by African countries directed at the United States.’

The African ambassadors issued the statement late Friday following an emergency meeting after Trump used vulgar language to reject an immigration bill, asking why the US would take in more people from Haiti and ‘s***hole countries’ in Africa.

Trump has denied using that language but others present say he did.

The African group of ambassadors to the United Nations has issued an extraordinary statement condemning the 'outrageous, racist and xenophobic remarks' by President Donald Trump and demanding a retraction and apology

The African group of ambassadors to the United Nations has issued an extraordinary statement condemning the ‘outrageous, racist and xenophobic remarks’ by President Donald Trump and demanding a retraction and apology

Former US ambassador to the UN Samantha Power has shared the statement on Twitter, saying: 'Whoa. I've never seen a statement like this by African countries directed at the United States'

Former US ambassador to the UN Samantha Power has shared the statement on Twitter, saying: ‘Whoa. I’ve never seen a statement like this by African countries directed at the United States’

The new statement expresses concern over the Trump administration’s apparent increasing denigration of Africa ‘and people of color.’

Meanwhile, at least one more African leader spoke up on Saturday.

Ghana’s President Nana Akufo-Addo called Trump’s remark ‘extremely unfortunate’ and said that ‘we will not accept such insults, even from a leader of a friendly country, no matter how powerful.’

Ghana is widely seen as a stable, peaceful country in an often turbulent region, and has close ties to the United States.

In 2009 Trump’s predecessor, Barack Obama, chose Ghana’s capital Accra to set out his foreign policy goals for Africa in a speech in which he said he saw Africa ‘as a fundamental part of our interconnected world’.

Africans were ‘partners with America on behalf of the future we want for all of our children. That partnership must be grounded in mutual responsibility and mutual respect,’ he said.

Ghana’s former president John Dramani Mahama, whom Akufo-Addo defeated in elections just a month after Trump’s own win at the polls, on Twitter asked: ‘Isn’t Trump demonstrating that he’s nothing but a racist and pursuing a policy of ‘Make America White Again’?’

He also highlighted the contrast between Trump’s praise for Africa last year when he met leaders from the continent on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly.

Ghanaian President Nana Akufo-Addo (seen in the above May 2017 stock photo) called Trump's remark 'extremely unfortunate' and said that 'we will not accept such insults, even from a leader of a friendly country, no matter how powerful'

Ghanaian President Nana Akufo-Addo (seen in the above May 2017 stock photo) called Trump’s remark ‘extremely unfortunate’ and said that ‘we will not accept such insults, even from a leader of a friendly country, no matter how powerful’

‘S***hole? Thought they said he was so impressed with us just last September?’ Mahama tweeted under a mocked-up photograph of Trump being shown a map of Africa in which all the countries were labelled ‘Nambia’.

Trump was widely derided last year after twice referring to Namibia as ‘Nambia’ at the September meeting.

Namibia on Saturday added its voice to the chorus of complaints, saying the president’s language had ‘no place in diplomatic discourse’ and was ‘contrary to the norms of civility and human progress’.

‘The Africa we know and live in is one that is recovering economically and rising,’ it added.

‘The USA we know is one that was built with blood and sweat of African slaves and immigrants from all over.’

Ghana's former president John Dramani Mahama, whom Akufo-Addo defeated in elections just a month after Trump's own win at the polls, on Twitter highlighted the contrast between Trump's praise for Africa last year when he met leaders from the continent

Ghana’s former president John Dramani Mahama, whom Akufo-Addo defeated in elections just a month after Trump’s own win at the polls, on Twitter highlighted the contrast between Trump’s praise for Africa last year when he met leaders from the continent

Trump reportedly demanded to know why the US should accept immigrants from ‘s***hole countries’, after lawmakers raised the issue of protections for immigrants from African nations, Haiti and El Salvador.

He has since denied using the reported language.

The 15-nation Caribbean Community meanwhile condemned Trump’s use of ‘repulsive language.’

CARICOM ‘is deeply disturbed by reports about the use of derogatory and repulsive language by the President of the United States in respect of our member state, Haiti, and other developing countries,’ the bloc’s Guyana-based headquarters said in a statement.

Trump took to Twitter on Saturday morning to throw heat off his back after the scandal regarding his disparaging comments.

The Donald wrote on Saturday: ‘Yesterday was a big day for the stock market. Jobs are coming back to America. Chrysler is coming back to the USA, from Mexico and many others will follow.

‘Tax cut money to employees is pouring into our economy with many more companies announcing. American business is hot again!’

IMMIGRATION FROM HAITI, AND EL SALVADOR, WHICH TRUMP CALLED ‘S***HOLES’

Haiti

Until November, Haitians had ‘temporary protected status’, or TPS, which means hey are not subject to removal even if they have no other legal status.

It was introduced after the devastating 2010 earthquake, which shattered the country and killed 230,000 people.

But that status is ending, with the change to take effect on July 22 2019, which will force all Haitians who have the status to either find a legal way to stay or face deportation.

The total number of people affected is estimated at 46,000 but that may be a significant under-estimate.

Already large numbers of Haitians have fled to Canada, generating a mini-crisis there last year as it dealt with arrivals at its border crossings.

Haiti, however, is itself in bad shape. It is by far the poorest country in the Americas, and rated 209th poorest country in the world, out of 230 in total, putting it below Afghanistan and Ethiopia.

Unemployment is 40 per cent, and less than a third of the workforce have formal jobs, while the economy is still recovering from the latest massive natural disaster, Hurricane Mathtew, which hit in 2016.

Other statistics are also appalling: illiteracy is as high as 40 per cent, average per capita income has been estimated at $400 per person, and even though the country’s debt was canceled in 2010, it has already reached more than $2 billion, mostly owed to Venezuela.

A mass arrival of tens of thousands from the U.S. would be doubly bad news, economists say, as there are no jobs for them and the cash from remittances which they sent has become a key part of the economy.

El Salvador

El Salvadorans have had TPS since 2001, when an earthquake similar to Haiti’s hit an already troubled country.

It had never truly recovered from the 12-year-long civil war which started in 1980 and killed an estimated 75,000, and January 2001’s earthquake and the mudslides it triggered caused more havoc.

The death toll was less than 1,000, but up to a quarter of a million homes and buildings were destroyed or damaged and the country lost half its economic output.

In total, an estimated 250,000 El Salvadorans are in the U.S. on TPS, compared to a population of 6.1 million – making their remittances once of the key sources of foreign cash. In total remittances from all emigrants account for a fifth of its gross domestic product.

Compared to Haiti, El Salvador is far wealthier, ranking 143rd in the world on wealth, and literacy rates are far higher, but it is scarred by gang crime which makes it one of the world’s most dangerous places.

There were 81.2 murders for every 100,000 people in 2016, the highest casualty rate outside a war zone anywhere in the world. In 2016, there were 5,200 murders.

In comparison, the U.S. had 17,25 murders in 2016, a rate of 5.3 per 100,000. The rate in Norway – where Trump welcome arrivals from – was 0.6 per 100,000 in 2015.

The most notorious in the U.S. is MS-13, which ironically originated in Los Angeles, as did its rival M-18.

Their bitter rivalry fueled the murder rate and also overshadows the criminal justice system, with police constantly in the crossfire.

Posted on; DailyMail>>

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